MATH & GEOMETRY Vocabulary and Terminology in English

542681 month ago


Published on September 18, 2017
Uploaded By: English Lessons with Adam - Learn English with Adam [engVid]

Do you need to speak about or understand mathematics or geometry in English? This lesson teaches you all the terminology you need to translate your mathematics knowledge into English. This video will be especially important for students who are studying in an English-speaking country, and for professionals who need to work with English speakers. I'll also explain the correct sentence structures we use to talk about common mathematical operations in English. For example: "One plus one equals two", "one and one is two", "if you add one and one, you get two", and many more. This lesson covers terminology about: operations (+ - * /), fractions, decimals, exponents, roots, shapes, measurements, angles, triangles, and much more. Don't let English stand in the way of your mathematics!

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TRANSCRIPT

Hi. Welcome to www.engvid.com. I'm Adam. In today's video I'm going to look at some math. Now, I know this is an English site, don't worry, I'm not actually going to do any math. Philosophy and English major, so math not my favourite, but I will give you some math terminology, words that you need if you're going to do math. Now, a lot of you might be engineers or you might be students who came from another country to an English-speaking country, and you go to math class and you know the math, but you're not sure of the wording. Okay? So this is what we're looking at, terminology, only the words that you need to go into a math class or to do some math on your own. Okay?

We're going to start with the very basics. You know all these functions already. I'm just going to give you some ways to talk about them, and then we'll move on to some other functions and other parts. So, you know the four basic functions: "addition", "subtraction", "multiplication", and "division". What you need to know is ways to say an equation. Right? You know an equation. "1 + 1 = 2", that's an equation. "x2 + y3 = znth", that's also an equation which I'm not even going to get into.

So, let's start with addition. The way to talk about addition. You can say: "1 plus 1", "plus", of course is "+" symbol, that's the plus symbol. "1 plus 1 equals 2." 2 means the total, is also called the "sum". Now, you can also say: "The sum of 1 and 1 is 2." You can also just say, without this part: "1 and 1 is 2." So you don't need the plus, you don't need the equal; you can use "and" and "is", but it means the same thing. Everybody will understand you're making... You're doing addition. Sorry. Doing addition, not making. If you add 1 and 1, you get 2. Okay? So: "add" and "get", other words you can use to express the equation. Now, if you're doing math problems, math problems are word problems. I know a lot of you have a hard time understanding the question because of the words, so different ways to look at these functions using different words, different verbs especially.

If we look at subtraction: "10 minus 5 equals 5". "5", the answer is also called the "difference". For addition it's the "sum", for subtraction it's "difference". "10, subtract 5 gives you 5." Or: "10 deduct"-means take away-"5", we can also say: "Take 5 away"... Oh, I forgot a word here. Sorry. "Take 5 away from 10, you get", okay? "10 subtract 5", you can say: "gives you 5", sorry, I had to think about that. Math, not my specialty. So: "Take 5 away from 5, you get 5", "Take 5 away from 5, you're left with", "left with" means what remains. Okay, so again, different ways to say the exact same thing. So if you see different math problems in different language you can understand what they're saying. Okay?

Multiplication. "5 times 5", that's: "5 times 5 equals 25". "25" is the "product", the answer to the multiplication, the product. "5 multiplied by 5", don't forget the "by". "5 multiplied by 5 is 25", "is", "gives you", "gets", etc.

Then we go to division. "9 divided by 3 equals 3", "3", the answer is called the "quotient". This is a "q". I don't have a very pretty "q", but it's a "q". "Quotient". Okay? "3 goes into... 3 goes into 9 three times", so you can reverse the order of the equation. Here, when... In addition, subtraction, multiplication... Well, actually addition and multiplication you can reverse the order and it says the same thing. Here you have to reverse the order: "goes into" as opposed to "divided by", so pay attention to the prepositions as well. Gives you... Sorry. "3 goes into 9 three times", there's your answer. "10 divided by 4", now, sometimes you get an uneven number. So: "10 divided by 4" gives you 2 with a remainder of 2, so: "2 remainder 2". Sometimes it'll be "2R2", you might see it like that. Okay? So these are the basic functions you have to look at. Now we're going to get into a little bit more complicated math things. We're going to look at fractions, exponents, we're going to look at some geometry issues, things like that.